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Marion Motley Scholarship Applications being accepted

Posted Sep 26, 2013

The Cleveland Browns Foundation, in partnership with College Now Greater Cleveland, has begun to accept applications for the Marion Motley Scholarship Program.

“The future is in our children.”

The Cleveland Browns Foundation, in partnership with College Now Greater Cleveland, has made it their mission to help local high-school students pursue their dreams of a college education through the Marion Motley Scholarship Program, and applications are being accepted, now through Oct. 25, 2013.

Two students will be selected for the four-year, renewable scholarship in the amount of $2,500 a year.

“We are honored to support local students who are investing in their futures and our community through the Cleveland Browns Foundation Marion Motley Scholarship with College Now Greater Cleveland,” said Renee Harvey, vice president of the Cleveland Browns Foundation. “It provides these deserving individuals with assistance to achieve their goals and capitalize on opportunities, a fitting initiative to represent Marion Motley and his values.

“We’re really looking for students who are goal-oriented, self-motivated, hard-working individuals, both inside and outside the classroom. The scholarship is designed for students who are giving back to their communities.”

The Cleveland Browns Foundation Marion Motley Scholarship was named after one of the Browns’ 16 Pro Football Hall of Famers, former halfback Marion Motley. One of the first four African-Americans to integrate professional football in 1946, Motley overcame many obstacles on his way to 3,024 yards and 31 touchdowns in four championship seasons in the AAFC, and another 1,688 yards and eight touchdowns in five years in the NFL.

Motley was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1968, and the Cleveland Browns’ Ring of Honor in 2010.

“With Marion Motley being one of the first African-Americans to play in the NFL, his perseverance and determination were immeasurable,” Harvey said. “We feel like those are qualities many of the high-school applicants who are submitting their applications have.

“Many times, these are the first generations of students from their families interested in going to college. If we help more people get into college, we feel that will have a major impact on that family and the community as a whole.”