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Need to Know: Browns DB Jabrill Peppers won't rest following breakout practice

Jabrill Peppers was all over the field Monday in what could be described as a breakout practice for the Browns rookie safety.

Peppers, the former Michigan star and 25th overall NFL Draft pick, intercepted Brock Osweiler in an end-of-game drill, broke up several passes and laid a punishing hit on receiver Rannell Hall.

Asked about his big day, Peppers shrugged it off and spoke of improvement instead.  

"A lot of things I can still do better," he said Tuesday when asked about the session. "I think yesterday I showed flashes of what I can do, but I still have a lot to improve on. It was good to finally get a turnover and to finally just play ball. I just feel like there's still a lot of work that needs to be done."

Jackson has said the Browns will use Peppers, who played safety, linebacker, kick/punt returner and some running back in college, "every which way" they can this fall.

And in what was one of Cleveland's most intense span of practices, it's starting to become clear what kind of impact Peppers could have in multiple facets.

"The main thing was it was one of the last practices and one of the days when we really have to dig deep," Peppers said.

The Browns wrap up their third-to-last public practice Tuesday afternoon.

"I just wanted to bring some juice and help the guys get going on both sides of the ball. It's all competition, but at the end of the day, we're a team. (The offense is) going to feed off of us and we feed off them. That was just my main thing was just try to be in the right spots at the right time and play fast. Coach always says good things happen when you play fast. That was just my main objective." 

Here's what else you need to know as the Browns wrapped up their third-to-last public practice.

— If Gregg Williams were to issue rookie defensive end and No. 1 overall NFL Draft pick Myles Garrett a progress report, it'd be full of positive marks.  "I've never had a chance to draft the first overall pick ever, but I have had some pretty high draft picks. He's the one that has jumped out and fit in faster than any of the other ones, and I have had some really, really good ones," the defensive coordinator said.

"The reason that he moved up the depth chart was because of him and his teammates, not because of my evaluation. One of the things we do is when those guys come in the door, they are dead last on the depth chart. How do you handle that? How do you handle the locker room? How do you handle the meeting room? How do you handle the field? How do you handle the walkthroughs? How do you handle being humble? How do you handle being respectful? He is a really good young man and a pretty good player, too."

— Speaking of Williams, whom head coach Hue Jackson tabbed in January to mold a young defense, Jackson said that objective is trending in the right direction.

"Oh my gosh, what he's doing on defense is what you need," he said. "One man can't do it. Me and him can't do it. It's our whole staff. It's directed from top down. That is the way we go about it. Obviously, myself, him and Coach Tabes (special teams coordinator Chris Tabor) are the leaders of our groups, but at the same time, the assistants have to carry the message as well as the coordinators, and they have. It's an everyday thing. We're pushing and pulling, and the guys are responding. That is what you look for."

— After seeing Isaiah Crowell post 952 yards and seven touchdowns on 198 carries last season, Kirby Wilson expects big things from the fourth-year running back this fall. "Nothing short of a spectacular year," the run game coordinator/running backs coach said.

"He has worked extremely hard here during training camp. He has all of the physical tools. We think that his work ethic and his attitude about how he approaches his job every day should lead to a really special season for him."

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