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'Scandal' actor Paul Adelstein talks Cleveland Browns

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You might recognize Paul Adelstein from hit television shows like Scandal, Prison Break and Private Practice.  His successful career is important to him. But so are his Cleveland Browns.

Need proof for Adelstein's devotion? The actor and his brother Eric each got their father Harvey a Father's Day gift: One Brian Hoyer jersey and one Duke Johnson Jr. jersey.

"We want him to have the full range of the quarterback competition at his becking call whenever he wants," said Adelstein.

Adelstein was in Canton for the Hall of Fame game in 1999, the Cleveland Browns' rebirth back into the NFL word. And friends of Adelstein gave his now four-year-old daughter Josephine with Browns themed clothing as gifts during a baby shower.

Growing up in Chicago during the 80s, being a Browns fan was actually quite a bit of work.

Adelstein and his family would anxiously huddle around the TV, awaiting the studio halftime show of the Bears game, hoping to catch a glimpse of some Browns highlights. If they were lucky, the nearby Milwaukee market would pick up a Browns game. If that were the case, Adelstein remembers holding the TV between channels four and five to pick up the fuzzy signal. Later in the decade, a company called Sports Phone was launched. Adelstein dialed into the hotline for 50 cents per call, getting the most updated score of the Browns game.

"The cool thing about it was that the Browns were our family's thing," said Adelstein, 45, about following the franchise growing up. "Nobody else was into it the way we were in Chicago. It did give us a kind of us-against-the-world attitude. Which I didn't realize at the time was kind of every Browns fans attitude."

Without hesitation, Adelstein rattled off his favorite Browns memory. It was a 1987 AFC divisional playoff game against the New York Jets. Cleveland prevailed 23-20 in double overtime, behind 489 passing yards from Bernie Kosar.

"That was definitely a high point," recalled Adelstein fondly. "There's been lots of good moments throughout the years. It's all my family would talk about all week."

There have been many high points during Adelstein's career, too. After years doing theatre and performing as a musician in Chicago, he made the move to Los Angeles and it's paid off. The actor contends he's working in the, "Golden age of television."

Adelstein to this day still gets recognized on the streets as Paul Kellerman, the assassin he played on Prison Break. Though his fanfare isn't outrageous by any means, Adelstein does have friends whose every move is scrutinized by the paparazzi, like a certain Browns quarterback.

"It can be pretty scary for people," said Adelstein. "It's probably super confusing. I can't even imagine being that age and having that kind of attention put on you. That degree of pressure is tough. I think [the paparazzi] hang around waiting for you to screw up."

As for the Browns, Adelstein still has a major thing to cross off his bucket list. He's an active Browns Backer member and frequent sports bars to catch the games. He's seen the Browns play several times against his hometown Chicago Bears at Soldier Field. But he still hasn't been to a game at FirstEnergy Stadium.

"I'm almost embarrassed to admit that," said Adelstein jokingly. "I'd be completely disoriented being in the Browns stadium. I can't imagine what it would be like to be in a stadium where everyone is rooting for the Browns."

We see continued success for Adelstein. He's currently in Vancouver filming Girlfriend's Guide to Divorce, set to become Bravo's first scripted television series.

"I've had a string of good luck," said the down-to-earth Adelstein.

The 2014 version of the Browns has Adelstein literally counting down the days until kickoff Week One at Pittsburgh. He sees a young and hungry team with a potentially dominant defense. Mix that in with some strings of good luck, and who knows? It might be a season scripted for Hollywood.

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