2020 NFL Draft

What you should know from Ole Miss' star-studded Pro Day

The eyes of the NFL Draft world were trained on Oxford, Mississippi, on Monday where Ole Miss held its Pro Day.

After all, it's not every day when three potential first-round picks — left tackle Laremy Tunsil, wide receiver Laquon Treadwell and defensive end Robert Nkemdiche — are members of the same team.

Here's what you should know from Oxford.

Tunsil a lock at No. 1?

Widely considered the best offensive linemen in the draft, Tunsil has long been projected as the first overall pick in April's NFL Draft.

The Titans (who hold the No. 1 selection) could use someone to block for second-year quarterback and former Heisman Trophy winner Marcus Mariota. And Tunsil, — a 6-foot-5 310-pound prospect with quick feet and unusual lateral speed — seems to fit the bill.

"I have no idea how you could pass on a left tackle who moves like he does," Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze told the NFL Network.

On Monday, Tunsil only helped his draft stock by looking sharp in on-field drills and notching 32 repetitions on the bench press. "That was my goal to get over 30 reps and I did," Tunsil told the network.

Tunsil also played down the notion of being the first player drafted by saying he wouldn't be surprised if someone else's name was called next month.

"There's a lot of teams out there and there's a lot of good players out there," he said, "so like I said, whatever team that picks me I'm going to give them my all."

Laquon Treadwell, the top-ranked WR prospect out of Ole Miss, highlighted the team's Pro Day on Monday.

Treadwell brushes off 40 time; ​'I'm just a playmaker'

Treadwell has solidified himself as one of — if not the — best receivers in this year's draft class. Treadwell — who caught 82 passes for 1,153 yards and 11 touchdowns last season and lifted Ole Miss to Sugar Bowl win over Oklahoma State — looked fit at the combine last month and was especially smooth during on-field drills.

But Treadwell's 40-yard dash time — an event he opted not to perform in Indianapolis— has remained something of a potential weakness.

So when he clocked unofficial times of 4.63 and 4.65 seconds at Pro Day, Treadwell was forced to address the elephant in the room in an interview with NFL Network analyst Mike Mayock.

"I didn't run what I wanted to run, but it was fun. I'm proud of myself for what I did run most importantly. I gave it my all," Treadwell said.

"I'm just a playmaker. When I get into the game it's a different feeling than just running the 40-yard dash. I think any great athlete can tell you that. I don't know man, it's just the adrenaline rush and the pride you have playing football instead of running the 40. I just go out and try to give it my all every play and every game. And I end up making most of the plays."

But it could affect Treadwell's draft stock. NFL Network analyst Daniel Jeremiah said his 40-time wasn't ideal.

"I don't think he's somebody that's going to go in the top seven or eight picks. But I think once you start getting to No. 10, which is the Giants, I think he starts coming into the discussion there and then I think you probably see him go off somewhere in the middle of the first round."

Freeze, the Ole Miss coach, pointed to Treadwell's acrobatic plays throughout the year, including one in which he more or less scooped a pass of the head of Alabama cornerback Cyrus Jones for a touchdown in a win over the Crimson Tide.

"I think that speaks volumes over what the clock says on a 40 time," Freeze said.

Is Nkemdiche a 'boom or bust' for teams?

Nkemdiche on Monday reaffirmed he's arguably one of the most athletic defensive lineman to come through the draft in recent years.

But questions loom over Nkemdiche's character on and off the field.

"I've had conversations with him and then conversations with the teams. When I talk to him I'm like, for your talent level, you should have so much better production. And he's like, 'I understand. I didn't have the motor running at all times, I didn't necessarily bring my A-game every week or whatever,'" NFL Network analyst Bucky Brooks said during a broadcast.

"But then when you talk to some teams that are doing more than just interviewing him, they've issued tests and stuff, he tests off the charts when it comes to motivation, work ethic and desire and all that stuff. So it's going to be a tough debate because I believe he's going to be the biggest boom or bust prospect we talk about in this class."​

This article has been reproduced in a new format and may be missing content or contain faulty links. Please use the Contact Us link in our site footer to report an issue.

Related Content

Advertising