Press Conference

Browns player press conferences - Gillan, Bitonio, Randall

P Jamie Gillan:

On going from uncertain about making the 53-man roster to AFC Special Teams Player of the Month:

“I am very grateful for receiving that. I am honored. I never really thought about anybody thinking I was a nobody. I was just going out there, punting the ball and doing good things for (special teams coordinator) Coach (Mike) Priefer, the punt team and the team. I think about the team more than anything. Just trying to get fair catches, flip the field, inside the 20 and help the defense out.”

On switching from a three-step technique to a two-step:

“Me and Coach Priefer have a great relationship, and we talk about stuff like that all of the time. Three-step was just something I chose to do my last year of school just because I thought it was going to help me get more power into the ball but not realizing the older I get and the more work I put in and the flexibility, it was all going to come together anyway. Coach Prief one of these days just decided, ‘Hey, let’s see what you have with two-step.’ I had punted the ball just as good if not better than a three-step, and he kind of said at first, ‘No, let’s wait until the offseason.’ Then we went out again and he said, ‘Let’s see the two step again’, and I two-stepped. ‘You want to do it now?’ I said, ‘Coach, I will do whatever you want man. We can do this now and get it done,’ He said, ‘Cool’. He kept asking, ‘Are you sure?’ I am absolutely positive. I trust Coach Priefer with everything that we think is going to work. We know there are going to be training wheels a couple times, but as long as you stick to it, work on your technique and use the JUG work as much as possible, I am sure it can be successful.”

On if using the two-step technique is more beneficial from a psychological standpoint or technique:

“We are hoping and what we think is going to happen is eliminating that jab step will eliminate inconsistencies so catching the ball, flipping it, one-two and it is out of there. It should speed up our ops times as a whole because (LS) Charley (Hughlett) has a really fast snap and is accurate. Catch, flip the ball and it is gone. It should eliminate people wanting to block it because they realize they are not going to get to the ball and all of that stuff. It should be nothing but positive for us.”

On if he made the technique change in the game against Baltimore:

“It was actually the New York Jets game. That is when it started.”

S Damarious Randall:

On 49ers QB Jimmy Garoppolo:

“Veteran quarterback. Can make all of the throws. Works perfectly for their offense. Looking forward to playing him Monday night.”

On the 49ers offense and if 49ers Head Coach Kyle Shanahan is hard to defend against:

“He is a great coach. Everywhere he has been, his track record speaks for itself. He is a pretty good coach so those guys will be ready to go.”

On challenges facing 49ers TE George Kittle:

“He is one of the best tight ends in the league. The run after catch is amazing, very athletic. Definitely one of the best guys in the league.”

On the importance of stringing together good performances:

“That is always the goal to go 1-0 each week and just see what we can do to put wins together and continue to get better as a team and as a whole.”

G Joel Bitonio:

On establishing the Browns offense’s identity against Baltimore:

“Yeah, I think that was the blue print. We ran the ball early. It was not as successful, but we wore them down a little bit and then finally we broke some big runs in the second half. Some shots down the field. Big plays either from (WR) Jarvis (Landry) on a couple of those little passes to (TE) Ricky (Seals-Jones) running down there for the 60-70-yard catch. Just mixing it up and keeping the defense guessing. There were motions. There was movement, there were different looks and different routes out of the same looks. You have to think, ‘Oh this is a run look’, and we end up passing out of it. Things like that. Changing it up and getting into a rhythm. I think it started with establishing the run. It was not perfect in the first half. We only maybe ran for 40 yards in the first half or something, but you do it, you establish it, you show them those formations and then you can do some things off of those.”

On the importance of establishing an offensive identity:

“With one game, it is hard to say that is the identity of the team so we have to improve on that. We don’t want to be like, ‘Oh that was a fluke game and they played really well for one game on offense.’ We want to try and do that again against everybody.”

On if the performance against the Ravens felt like the Browns’ 2018 offense:

“Yeah, we were getting chunk plays. I thought (QB) Baker (Mayfield) did a great job of getting the ball out of his hands. Chubb was making people miss and doing good things. It felt good. It felt like we were in a rhythm finally. It felt like we were getting first downs on drives. We did not have third downs [and 15] where we have to drop back and pass. We had that first one where it was not great, but after that, I felt like everything was kind of just moving. It was different on third down. It was third and short or something like that. I also thought they did a great job of overcoming some penalties. In the first game, we had some penalties and we did not keep those first downs, but this game we had a couple first and 20, first and 25 and we overcame those and got some points out of those.”

On RB Nick Chubb’s humble demeanor and if there is more to his personality that the public doesn’t see:

“Quiet. Hard-working. Great guy. If those are not the things you haven’t seen, that is pretty much it. Honestly, I do not know. I think Freddie (Kitchens) said it the other day, he is the guy you want on your football team. The perfect guy, always works hard and always is keeping his head down. He always gives credit to other guys, even when he is the guy making the plays. It is impressive. I think it is just his upbringing and the person he is on and off the field. I do not know if you guys watched it, but his mic’d up was pretty much what he is – quiet guy, runs hard and does his part.”

TE David Njoku:

On not initially knowing he injured his wrist during the NY Jets game on September 16:

“To be honest, I did not really notice it at the time. I was trying to get back in. Luckily – well I guess not luckily – but I also had a concussion so I was not allowed to go back in. I got an MRI the next day, and I realized that I had fractured my wrist.”

On if he potentially would have reentered the game not knowing he had a broken wrist if not for the concussion :

“Yeah, things could have been a little worse so I thank god for that.”

On if he had surgery on his wrist:

“No.”

On if not electing to have surgery increases his chances of returning this season:

“I think so. Hopefully. God willing, you know?”

On if there may be an opportunity to return from injured reserve following the eight-game minimum:

“For sure. I think so. I am doing a great rehab process. Every day I am here working. Hopefully, it works out.”

Related Content

Advertising